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that we understand how to answer those issues effective from a science perspective, and in a way that continues to maintain the availability of inexpensive natural gas that strengths the economy as well as help us reduce air emission. >> i appreciate that. i think it seems like a reasonable response. someone who asked you environmental law far long time. please, do what you can to work with the administration. so we don't have overlapping of potentially inconsistent regulations. very frustrating for the public. we want it to be done responsibly and in a way people can understand. thank you for being here. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, mr. peters. >> the gentle mab from arizona. >> thank you. i only had two things i wanted to walk through. everyone in the committee with us here yesterday. i'm sorry, you're going hear the same stheem again. the large data bases that are used particularly in things like pm10 which is a big deal in the desert, southwest we have the thing called dirt. without grass on it. so it really does affect our lives. down to the individual -- because
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the deal creating the world's largest airline became official today. american airlines emerged from bankruptcy to join with u.s. airways. the new carrier will operate under the american airlines name. the merger leaves four airlines controlling more than 80% of the american travel market. passengers won't see immediate changes to reservations or frequent flyer programs, and it remains unclear if the deal will mean higher fares. eight of the most prominent u.s. tech companies, including apple, google and facebook, are calling for tighter controls on government surveillance. they sent an open letter to president obama today, in the wake of revelationshat the go
a country school system. it meant a student's ability in math science and reading let's look at the latest results map to see shanghai singapore hong kong the first three positions number one two and three respectively france in the uk number twenty five and twenty six to the total of sixty five countries measured in these surveys. science results showing much the same kind of results that east asian. school systems scoring the highest shanghai hong kong singapore once again number one two and three friends and the uk in mid twenties and the literacy results opening much the same thing with the station systems scoring the highest france and uk also in those middle rankings in the mid twenties. that's always the asian country's top the world rankings that's pretty clear european countries such as france and uk struggling to compete france in particular sliding down the ratings and rankings despite spending more on its goals then other countries in the and today we ask how to prepare today's kids for tomorrow's world and make sure they leave school with all the right skills with both those q
that increasingly powerful scientific explanations of natural regularities, what we call science, provide progressively compelling evidence against the claims of revealed religion as such. so the more science explains, it is thought, the less room there is for god. this view turns out to be the result of contingent and often unknowingly held metaphysical assumptions with immediate -- medieval roots the historical significance of these assumptions became unexpectedly important starting in the 17th 17th century because of the ways in which controversy in the reformation era unintentionally marginalized theological discourse about god in the natural word. that leaves scientific and fifth sol cal discower discough of trying to talk about god. in chapter 2, the protestant reformation are analyzed as the two mores important and related means by which attempts were made to ground truth claims by those who rejected immediate evil christianant. thatthat's has unintended pleasurisms based on the bible and reason. impasses and the rear familiar -- reformation era helped -- but historically, and empi
a decade or two of really getting the kind of science we needed to make that case and to understand the brain as being the basis of both normal and abnormal behavior. host: the president talking about the brain initiative, calling this the next major american project -- what is he talking about? guest: to put that into context, he was thinking about the last two great american projects in science. one was the apollo project to put a man on the moon. and then the human genome project. the next great american project is what he is calling the brain initiative. and that is an initiative that will involve several government agencies, among them nih and the defense advanced research project agency and the national science foundation as well as private partners to take our understanding of the brain and how it works and bring it up a notch. try to figure out a way to develop the tools to decode the language of the brain. we have gone a long way recently, but we knew -- need to go much further much faster to understand the basis of how the brain works and how it sometimes does not work so
the skyline of florence, he also systematized the science of perspective which was to dominate western pictorial space until the 20th century. in masaccio's fresco of the trinity-- probably constructed with brunelleschi's advice on architecture-- classical columns and a monumental barrel vault frame the figures of christ and god, the father. here is the interaction of painting, architecture, and the mathematical analysis of space that was unique to the florentine renaissance. 1n 1419, brunelleschi had begun the hospital of the innocente. it was the first orphanage in europe to be funded by public donations, and the architecture is a delicate blending of the roman and the romanesque. it was brunelleschi's architecture which the painter fra angelico depicted in his fresco of the annunciation, which awaits you at the top of the stairs of the monastery of san marco. fra angelico lived and worked here, decorating the monastery with scenes from the new testament-- scenes striking for their simplicity and serenity. inside the cells, the world seems to retreat, leaving a single image suspended
journalistic science lacks reliable reference. of both popular and high literary culture to be the tumultuous commissioned of the virgin and modes of thought in the in antebellum period a and choreographed the three stretches completely. rather than read the the high renaissance to read those as burst by wide popular writing immediately with the perceived reality the results with the political point of view to reanimate the of the blind alley. and then the first instance with the social engagement of the practice but he does so while incorporating and modified critical forms. john browne did jacksonian america did each marked with the hard work of three big it always a pleasure to engage david on the page and each book richly informs the sense of their subjects collectively and david i am grateful for your work and a remarkable career that continues with undiminished vigor. thank you very much and i apologize for my departure. [applause] >> first things first congratulations i think the more remarkable thing that is beneath the amazon since it is 25 years ago you cannot have the willingness t
in reading, 17th in science, 25th in math. 34 nations. we're a better nation than that. to compete and remain internationally globally competitive, we have to change and we haven system to address the needs of our employers. it up to you open guys, but before we do that, manziel y, is johnny going to win the heisman again? >> i don't have a clue. i played six-man football. >> you're an aggie, you're yeah, baby, yeah. >> i don't have an idea. he is fun to watch play. here's what i will project. i will make a prediction -- that i'm very confident in and that is that texas a&m will beat the lsu this weekend in football. >> all right. lsu fans out here. >> bring that on, bobby jindal. >> come on, bobby. come on. >> let's open it up for questions. >> going to beat baylor. >> lsu -- >> we have a microphone? hand held microphone? okay, shout it out. >> that could be good. that could be good. >> can i ask the first question? first question. >> thank you. > what governor kasich said, not to say anything away from education. you did gloss over a little bit joe's fairness. asking about specifically taxe
on the leading, math and science scores of children around the world. where does the united states rank? stick around. bill: why the nfl will not air this commercial. >> for my family's safety is my highest priority. i am responsible for their protection. in the nation, we know how you feel about your car. so when coverage really counts, count on nationwide insurance. because what's precious to you is precious to us. ♪ love, love is strange just another way we put members first. because we don't have shareholders. join the nation. ♪ baby... ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ bill: disgusting, risque, but the nfl drawing the line when it comes to this spot. >> aim responsible for their protection. and no one has the right to tell me how to defend them. so i have chosen the most effective tool. bill: that spot is defending second amendment rights for the big game. super bowl ad or not, it's getting a lot of attention. it's gone viral online already. martha: disappointing news about america's education system. according to the latest survey when it comes to major subjects like math, reading a
, home to a science station and under it's de facto control. these strategic waters and rocks are claimed by beijing and seuol. >> south korea has asserted rights in the air above. >> translator: the new korean air space defense identification zone has been modified to be in line with the country's flight information region, which does not overlap with neighboring countries. this zone includes the air space over iado's waters. >> seuol's move comes two wheys after china's surprise extension of its air identification zone encroaching on those of south korea and japan. it overlaps that of japan. the government in seuol says it won't impose the new rule until december 15th, allowing for consultation with neighbors. we believe this will not significantly impact our relationships with china and with japan as we try to work for peace and cooperation in northeast asia. >> south korea's president discussed the plans with u.s. vice president joe biden during his visit last week. the u.s. state department has declared itself on the same page as seoul. china release truck driver pictures of militar
with predispositions to deadly diseases. you probably know that science has made giant leaps in detecting and treating some of those illnesses, but what you probably don't know is that at the same time, biotech companies have been patenting human genes. that's right. whether you like it or not, a vital part of who you are may now belong to someone else. >> let me just examine him. >> people are worried more than ever about how the chemicals we're exposed to are affecting our health. among them, a family of chemicals used in everyday plastics known as phthalates, which congress banned in toys after a study by dr. shanna swan. welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm lesley stahl. we'll be exploring the world of science in this episode. later we'll bring you morley safer's story about the human genome patents being awarded to biotech companies and the proprietary control they now have over part of who you are. and then my report on a ubiquitous chemical called phthalates, which is in everything from perfume to children's toys, but which may also be causing birth defects. but first, steve kroft's story on the
his masters in commuter science and other degrees from ucla. join me in welcoming our panel people. and as mayor as one of the finite cities in america why are you supporting immigration >> thank you carl. let me repeat my hangz or thanks for julia and kevin. this is the first company i visit in this city and carl thank you. and the carl bishop group is very important working with our chamber of commerce and the other nonprofit. a simple answer is jobs. the reason i'm working on immigration reform. i used to be a civil rights attorney and helped folks to 0 reunite with their families. but at the time the direction connect to the history of the city being a city of immigrants 35 percent of all the small businesses in san francisco was owned by an immigrant. our whole history this city's been built on good immigrants who found ideas and employed others. and today that story has not changed. i think that the businesses in succeed if we have good sound business policies but we make sure there's comprehensive immigration reform. because we've he learned over the years is that there are
and compare performances in reading, math and science. results from 2012 were released today, and, once again, the u.s. hovered near the middle of the pack, lagging in some areas even as other countries advanced. math remains the biggest challenge. 29 other systems had higher average scores than american high schoolers. the u.s. fared better in reading, where it ranked 20th, and in science, ranking 23rd. the best results were in east asia, where students from shanghai, singapore, south korea and japan, among others, placed near the top. pisa results also showed another concern for american teens as well: a smaller percentage of them reached the top levels of proficiency. as in the past, though, some education experts questioned just what and how much pisa tells us, given social, cultural and economic differences among nations. the pisa test is coordinated by the organization for economic cooperation and development, the o.e.c.d. andreas schleicher serves as deputy director for education and skills there. he helped develop and runs the tests, and joins us now. >> so explain to us first, what i
and science over great britain attended this meeting. and he said. he's very prompt the ball falls on all of them wood education in the united kingdom this is something absolutely a very insistent that the minister biggest biggest cheer. and because it's the uk says a leading company in education especially in the higher education system. i am from higher education myself and by unnoticed. pros the stairwell and the tallest reduce the chosen most or the united kingdom. plus the ride this this and other countries also but yes it did of those gatherings expressed the their pride then it probably didn't throw that they have returned and there with him for the benefit of all comfort and. presents they gave them a bit of wood to smile and say you do. it was amongst the class to class and the present the route to his strategy. kazakhstan two thousand fifty. and that these new generation of specialists. all of them have c'mon go to english. and the present. it affected the staff and when there was no time when one hundred and no one thousand and five hundred people speaking english. without tha
. >> passengers advised to get a tb shot. >> and a math and science and broethalizer and high school's controversy. >> and someone offers you alcohol. i might be alcohol tested and that eases the peer pressure off of you. y building a play set begins with a surprisewinge of back pain... and a choice. take up to 4 advil in a day or 2 aleve for all day relief. [ male announcer ] that's handy. ♪ >>> at the moment, a nationwide man hunt for a handyman colorado. police accuse him of shooting and killing three family members and setting their home on fire. the suspect, 59-year-old marry maps described as 6 feet tall, 135 pounds, red hair, blue eyes, said to live with the family up until a week before the incident. authorities say they consider maps to be armed and dangerous. southern colorado. >>> a scary situation for passengers aboard a us airways flight from austin, texas, to phoenix, after they were reportedly told that they may have been exposed to tuberculosis. word is emergency personnel cameonboard and announced that a passenger on board was carrying the disease. the centers for disease contro
it seems the only filly in the sloth of a and political science it's a safe and effective to treat it as a symbol of the trade of conduct aimed at encouraging essentially disposable batavia. we see evidence that among some reading twice the weight is gone. everyone seems to be quite sticky by the romans it's like it's not great is that love petition. it enables the still to carrying all full. it is folks the machines. and if you're not living with them it was still in the pre said the shell with the concept she'll undoubtedly plans to attend any that the shops of this flying thing that is constantly making rights and responsibilities in terms of the contents of the source responsible behind this and do things that completely soaked with irresponsible. i thought we'd make it to the maze. well now that it's taking the effects of the getting it they came to be. last point was that day plan my mom. oh my god wonder whether the subject with me. caring and just said liquidity out of it. most just going in the us will also want prawns. i was completely humiliated. what is great because i
from around the world. u.s. students are average in reading and science, below average in math. the u.s. came in 36 out of 65 developed countries between the slovak republican and lithuania. students in shanghai are more than two years ahead of the peers in massachusetts. the u.s. did better in reading, 24th in the world rankings. number one, shanghai again. science, the u.s. came in number 28 on that list. the top performer? you guessed it. shanghai, china. the u.s. will not get the most improved award. the u.s. fell in all three subjects from 2009 to 2012. u.s. education secretary arne duncan says it points a picture of education stagnation. is the u.s. falling behind or is everyone else getting better? i sat down with candy crowley and christiane amanpour and asked why the u.s. is falling behind. >> what is the problem with education? we keep throwing money at it. the interesting statistics are that the u.s. spends a huge amount of money on education, it doesn't spend as much as other countries which are currently doing better on disadvantaged schools. in other countries doing bett
parents did, to pursue careers in medicine, science, education. many are proud business owners of law firms, restaurants, grocery stores, shipping companies and hair braiding venues. there are those who have come as asylum seekers, feeling war, famine and again side. they come to the united states to become productive tax paying members of our society. and like the other immigrant groups, immigrants are dealing with the back logged immigration processing, families being ripped apart, falling out of status because they were eeked out. racial and status discrimination, felony laws that prohibit judicial review, deportation processes that violate human rights and prohibitive student visa programs limited access to work permits and much, much more. mr. speaker, it is imperative for us to acknowledge the fact that many immigrants arrive on our shores during a time in their lives when they are most productive. the most productive years in their lives. bringing them to the floor would deny us as a nation the opportunity to access their talent, their skill and abilities in the prime of their
are now on the lower end of the curve. below average in math and science. this is a competitive crisis for american business. why are we not succeeding here? what's being done to fix it? two leading people on the american education charge. first, though, to sue at the nyse. >> thank you very much. a rough day for the dow jones industrial average. we are off of our lows but still up 21% this year. right now the dow jones industrial average down 104 points. transports have been on a huge tear, down today, but up 35% year to date. the s&p also in the red today. it's up 25% this year. it's down just 7.3 points today. similar story at the nasdaq, up 27% year to date. let's bring in bp and kenny polcari, director o'neill's security and cnbc market analyst. we've been talking about the pivot point in the market, the turn in the market when it would come. is this what we're seeing today? >> i think it feels like. the only thing you have to be careful of, not a the lo of volume. we've only done 300 million shares which tells you the big the boys are sitting out and waiting. does feel like it wa
science of portland state. and says the free syrian army is trying to scare the west against groups like al qaeda. there were 31 groups involved in the syrian conflict. the number may have increased. al qaeda sees an opening to carry out its agenda. so it is merely taking advantage of the situation in syria. but one has to be careful. you know the head of the fsa, he would say al qaeda to are rest room, audience to frighten the westerners to support him. what they are, the people that he's talking about are islamist groups. there's a range in these 31 opposition groups from liberal, indeed to extremely religious conservative in in between. >> the rebels ousted former president in the central african republic in march are under fire themselves. a u.n. security council prepares to discuss a mandate of african union and french troops operating. if the resolution is adopted the forces will be providing support and supplies. more from the capital. >> we have heard gun fire and mortar rounds as well. all over this city. pretty close to where we are in this hotel now. the city is deserted. peop
to it that arises on the base i think it will fail but not for state elections state powers. the science that tradition this is a time to open. i know. i eye. sure or scolding the book is a rusty so uber rock show. two of the markham site. speed is director since two thousand and six. still makes show up all the students arrive on time with them i still get to it. one last ditch bid to show good in maths he is the issue the local cpa which to distribute the little one up on it. as a scene that improvements in its educational services before to follow that up by two thousand won only fifty thousands of white meat in children's court where tourists. this is international intervention beginners reason to eight million including premium goes up. but with five million children still out of school. dustin government is working hard to provide them i see the ducks this dish for the doctor who but a lot of it well he grows up. you see. but ago. all twenty of those the idea that it is the most honest i didn't add up. the central issue. so sit back and you're kinda itchy and what not to know what
of all, change. >> engineering doesn't have to be this incredibly intimidating math science thing. we can show girls engineering changes people's lives and it can help make the world a better place. >> sterling says goldie blocks is making money but not ready to say how much and it's one of four finalist for a contest to win a free super bowl commercial worth close to $4 million. that announcement is due in late january. we'll fill you in when we get it. >> play with the dolls and become an engineer and do great things for the country. >> absolutely. >> we can use more women like that. >> that's "nightly business report" for tonight. we want to remind you, this is the time of year your public television needs your support to make shows like this possible. >> i'm tyler mathisen. thanks for your support. have a great weekend, everybody. see you back here on monday. >>> night by business report has been brought to you in part by. >> thestreet.com, up to the minute stock market news and in depth analysis. our quant rating service prov e provides objective independent ratings daily on over 43
terrestrial landing map en route to the moon. it's being haled as a major milestone to the science program. china will send someone to the moon in 2020 now that we can no longer send someone to the moon. >> we know what's there. we're worried about what they want to use it for at this point. what is this jade thing, it drives around? >> yeah, like a buggy that will go around and check out the surface. >> maybe if it drives everywhere it could find a moon rock more interesting than what we've got. if they could cover the whole rock, the whole satellite. >> maybe they're going to deliver packages. >> maybe they're going to do that. >> deliver amazon packages to the moon. >> i love the moon, it's beautiful. it makes you feel nice, but i'm done with the moon. we need to go somewhere else to make it interesting. >> one of these 40 billion earth like planets that are supposed to be out there nerds, listen up. the largest known private memorabilia collection from the "lord of the rings" collection will be released this week. there will also be props used by the evil ring reichs, prosthetic hobbit
to this. this is a quote from the national association for medical research. he told the science insider website assigning rights akin to what humans have would be chaotic for the research community and doctor susan larson, an anatomist at storage brook studying the way chimps move, everything i do with these animals i have done on myself. i understand animal rights act visits don't want these animals studied. champ pans e studies played important roles in developing medicines for humans. people say shouldn't humans come first? >> well, the former head of nih last june said he had drunk the cool aid of animal experimentation. he thinks it was an error. the directliar of the nih is the one who said, we want to -- we don't think they should be used any more in nih sponsored. they are holding 50 back now that i think those 50 are going to go to sanctuaries. >> where would you want them to go? >> sharoninguaries. but they can't go there. so, we have a ranarranged with nap -- the north american prime mate sanction wary alliance. they have seven sanctuaries throughout the u.s. and that's where
at mcdonald's anymore or burger king. none of the food tastes right. they had a science project to tell me how many people have food -- ieating good still eat chitlins. was 13.d smoking when i what is this stuff going on for? it is not making people live longer. it is making people live longer. the lifespan span in the united states is going up. sure what genetic modification has to do with that. if you are eating genetically modified foods, if you are eating foods from the supermarket, just from the produce section, the chances are you are not eating anything that is genetically modified. there is a long list of foods that are not genetically modified. the only ones that i know about for short that are available are the genetically out of five papaya from hawaii -- the only ones that i know about for sure that are available are the genetically modified papaya from hawaii. if you bought them from stateside supermarkets, they llyl come from genetica modified varieties. i have been told there are some squash that come from genetically modified varieties. the percentages, i have been told, are no
, the u.s. failed to score in the top 20 in math, reading, or science. the american federation of teachers president says that is because the u.s. has a higher poverty rate than other countries. she spoke in washington this week at a it is hosted by the christian science monitor. this is just over an hour. >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn since her mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law firm for several years. she taught history in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as aft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or tweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agree
's not true in europe. >> rose: and falling behind in scores on math and science and engineering! >> rose: >> and also 25 years ago if you were a dropout you could work a lathe or a press, there were lots of jobs. you didn't even have to speak english. today there's low level jobs at fast food restaurants and hospitals but if you want to get a decent job that's challenging and fun you have to be able to use a computer. you have to speak in english. all these manuals are all in -- they're not in creole, they're not in portuguese, they're not in spanish. they're in english. so today being a dropout is a tragedy. it shouldn't be happening. >> rose: once you lose a step, you lose a second step and third step and fourth step. >> and literacy. there's an amazing correlation, the couple million people in prison, 85% of them are illiterate. not their fault. >> rose: here's the thing for me. the people -- you and so many people i know-- some deceased, some in youth, some -- but all passionate about education, passionate all have resources, all have a voice. why aren't we fixing this? >> i think fi
sights along the city's out of me pink to push it in my tuna. my due date assume you mean it to science. a musical when the rice for students in the seat across from us the country where i've come from. we may be the least the seal on its axis the inlets. so when i was last long. it looked awful study links. on to win the race was also calm. i am not winning so that the wound you would think is nice to use and abuse of our house we get to those. they are very long time political nice well kept going and it is going to prepare me to great heights from a deep sleep. but why is the costliest may be lots of going in terms of investment how would these i would be to sue would call long distance phone to realize that all of them. so i went to go due to its peak hours i would do it once more in ensuring that remain is too who want it needs to be good to go hubby just isn't what you want. i did still sees this playlist this book which counts more people talking. i always get outs. our box east east peace that no one has spoken of by just one little yellow eyes that you don't want the secret war
of the influence, and sought another explanation, that is to say a chemical polonium. to sum up, i trust science. when all the experts that they agree. my lawyer will request that the swiss expertise be handed over to the feoffment expertise, thank you. french experts. if you have any questions my lawyers -- it's very complicated. why is there so much difference. because it is so complicated. would you like us to express ourselves in english to sum it up or -- >> all right, so that was the press conference being held. she is the widow of the palestinian president yasir arafat, as well as her lawyer responding to a terrific report into the death of arafat which says that he wasn't poisons he died of a hemorrhage in his brine. basically saying that she is upset by the contradiction between the two reports and she will be asking the swiss experts, and the swiss expertise to be handed over to the french so that's just the gist of what yasir arafat was saying. let's cross to our european news center, and lauren taylor for that. >> says he is ready to negotiate, but he wants an end to the blockade of
it comes to the science is not on treating. the top of the costs of stevens and sung high tying a tiny government doesn't release results for the whole country. gemini schools than in belgium but about vietnam. and last month's kit including ten these results have improved considerably since the last piece of the pool it was published in two thousand gemini school is selling ban came as a cell. the reading skills of fifteen year old was found to be well then add the global operates children for migrant and for a social backgrounds placenta be at a particular disadvantage the study treated to a series of educational conferences in gemini and one of the country's federal states introduced reforms the latest results and that there's been some improvement among children from socially disadvantaged families. but critics say the system still leaves too many behind. still commutes between dusk and children only go to school for a day with you one of the main areas the anti reform in the german school system the children went to school for the whole day there were no longer to learn the more t
and science believes that after the unification of regents will create knowledge and innovation centers instead of two of three small universities which will bring in fact in the next few years the official website of the cars the minister of labour and social security has published an official statement without increasing the size of the mostly calculation and bakes and the median wages for twenty fourteen according to seoul told ok said the draw for the twenty fourteen to twenty cc national budget suggests improving the minimum calculation and expect one thousand eight hundred and fifty two team gear and sending the wages of nineteen thousand nine hundred and sixty six to get chrome generate twenty fourteen sites celestial ounces is probably going to be the least number one and two the child both the loans monthly child care payments up to one's year special stage allowances paid in benefits should only increase the speakers. in addition to the sublime to intrude use the indexation of basic social disability benefits britain and death benefits basic social benefits for the retired ben
that use that to come in the real issues. and that he himself was in on a science. we sat at a time for a proper reaching into two paintings so as president went on to nintendo has led to a pressie she didn't in any chinese people when the tough look that great contribution of nasa manned and all too well to the public's eyes off the two countries. thank you very much indeed nice to nuke waiting for my chinese ambassador to south africa now attending to ukraine now with intel is as handsome as maddie's the gangsta governments is killing us is still going on that now for what's happening on the ground in key outlet still too dark respondents which of the state has been falling situation but they say that i will reach out to protest isn't government have that sowed some polish was feeling laurie's of the situation is everything going peacefully on the streets. it is the protests the demonstration continues behind me in the wings this two of the ukraine the protesters say they are determined to continue despite the heavily implied threat of severe action from the prying eyes out of the
math science and stuff the little kid. fourth grade. the range of studies becomes more comprehensive and include subjects such as computing sixth graders. home economics subjects like sony it is. when getting english language classes the hungry and teachers of help when the chips to inspections some subjects like music pupils leave the room into a special touch the music is tuned to a cooling you can tune into playing instruments and to sing. the he would choke people's needs and do craft projects. a lot of games ten seconds. but any content on youtube or what the body of a platoon of us sports meet lots of space a practice to do some sports. i know. sports the medium and small special equipment. done in the gym. periods. it's time for lunch. indeed most schools pupils will be newer and faster. st jude's kenya korea builds the gym and on the corman groups. joining a sports car has the solution is to make new friends. since each club will have members from when fourth to sixth grade. to greek cookery across. children really enjoyed the fact of existence are allowed to choose what most
reports covers business and science culture and education historical and present day events as well as sports and leisure. in focus saturdays and sundays at four thirty pm she has two huge. i do. this year the day. hang on. even though it's a win on sunday shiites who make it. these i was so dead. he grew. it is. six season. steve. during the cd all the guests among them the whole family all gathered for the nobel banquet. think about this on some sort of. if you see i don't don't. instead of making students. but it's all been that's the ticket. he has done in time we have concluded percent. it was fun to post the court in vietnam to stomach was going for him notice that some entity and a lot of books albeit a mom to avoidable. this disgusts them hooked up the severity of the decade. it's a late day some of the animated series but it's because morrison of the cia identity can be. you will want one will you. the us. he said. i think. walt runway and welcome you. after ten the world's largest fine dedicated to battling climate change opened right here in korea this week. want a separa
johannesburg. we can bring in a guest from there. we will bring in a professor of political science and currently the vice chancellor of the university of -- who joins us from johannesburg. thank you for joining us. thank you for giving us your time. the mood within the country right now. an important is moment. it is a time of mourning. for lifeelebration that has been magnificently lived. a life that was in service of the african continent and more importantly, in service of humanity. there appears that that they are singing. they are singing in appreciation for a life that was magnificently lived. >> he lived to a fine old age. would you say that reconciliation with in south africa is one of the ways that he is fondly remembered? >> i think that that is something that he is. i think the reconciliation initiatives absolutely gave south africa breathing room. buildeathing room democratic institutions. to build an independent judiciary. south africa has problems with inequality, corruption and other challenges. firmly society that is established. nelsonfrica holds mandela on interna
and fallen further in the rankings down to 31st in math, 24th in science, 21st in reading of all things. and political prospect editor kelly mcnerney joins us and who is to blame for this? >> honestly, i think it's federal government spending we're using as a remedy, just throwing money at the problem. when you look at the numbers, it's startling. we spend $15,000 per every student in this country on education and that's more than every single country in the developed world and japan beat us in the international ranking that you mentioned and we're throwing money at the problem. it's not the lack of spending, it's the character of the spending. it's not trickling down to the classroom, it's federal government regulation and it should be a state-run education should belong to the state and no child left behind. it usurps a lot of power from the states and that to me that's the problem not relegating to the states. stuart: you'd get rid of it-- not all of it, but some of the bureaucracy because that's where the money is flowing, the administrators of the schools and all kind of people bac
a doomsday science that wallows in pessimism. they recalled when they describe intelligence, he evokedded memory of when he was milking a cow on the farm down in the river as a young nan, and he said he would get the basket still with pure milk, and the cow would relieve itself in the milk, and president johnson said the release, and he meant that in a bad way, that was intelligence. so you -- [laughter] you can imagine how that hurt our feelings. [laughter] there's another metaphor that i hear, the famous comment that we, in the intelligence community, like to provide options to policymakers, and so we look out at the world an say we are at the cross roads. one path leads to death and destruction, and the other path leads to total annihilation. we hope you policymakers will be able to have the wisdom to choose the right course. [laughter] in fact, in my experience and experience i think we relate today on the bulcans is it is when it works well, a collaborative enterprise with vast capabilities to bring to the fight, but also with clear limitations to be understood by leaders who know th
on to get there. >> i'm joined by derrick pitts, scientist at the franklin institute science museum. there's disagreement over the last few days about what happened to ison. nasa says it's a gonna, is there something there in. >> i think what happened, antonio was a to usle between this not very well consolidated nucleus, the gravitational pull of the sun and the heat of the sun, the heat of the sun sublime, frozen gases and the loosely compacted material left in the nucleus in the comments had nothing to hold it together. the solar wind took care of it after that. as we look at the images from the satellites looking at the sun. what we see is what's left of ison, a mere shadow of its former self. >> no hope that we'll get a good show in the sky. >> i don't think we'll see much from the ground. folks will be out with binoculars. a big telescope under dark skies might show us a whisk of what is left. it's left to the satellites on orbit. >> the possibility of it hitting earth was ruled out before it passed the sun. is there a chance that it blew apart and there are fragments that something
at home, students showed little improvement over the previous tests, scoring 481 in math, 497 in science and 498 in reading. they failed to make the top 20 list in any subject. today, education secretary, arne duncan called it a sign of educational stagnation. >> the brutal truth, that reality, must serve as a wake-up call against educational complacency. the problem is not that our 15-year-olds are performing worse today than before, the problem is that they are simply not making progress. >> the tests also show that students in several countries that lag behind the u.s. back in 2009 now outperform american students in many key categories. the global exam is given every three years to more than half a million students. >>> sounds like a dream on wheels. it's in production in our area. 261 miles to the gallon. you can fill up once and drive for weeks or longer. northern virginia bureau reporter, david culver gives us a look at the car of the future. >> reporter: we are at volkswagen headquarters for you. look at the xl-1. this is the newest edition. the woman with the keys is telling us
years, american 15-year-olds have fallen further behind in math, science and reading. it's dubious for a country that spends more on education than anything else. it's a key test given to 15-year-olds in 65 countries. the u.s. ranks 36th in math. east asian countries top all three categories in science, the u.s. ranks 28th. only in reading are u.s. students really above average and still pretty much in the middle of the pack. shanghai takes every spot but they hardly represent all of china. it's a slim, slim look about the education system in china. the u.s. slipped in the rankings since 2009. scores are a little changed from the first report in 2000. what's wrong here? the report blames weak u.s. curriculum and education secretary arne duncan calls it a picture of educational stagnation. this is a reality at odds with aspirations to have the best educated work force in the world. he's pushing new common core standards in 45 states. a nationwide drive to standardize education hoping to stem the slide and reenergize american students. brooke? >> we roll on. i'm brooke baldwin here i
the sport they began understanding -- >> rose: peter did? >> peter morgan as sort of the science of the overtake in formula one which is different than nascar. it's something you have to wait for. >> rose: how do you get around the car. >> right. and he tried to define their lives. he didn't just interview some people and throw the facts together, he was able to design a narrative that is a serious overtaking. i think it's another thing that really surprises audience is that, you know, you never quite see what's coming next. >> rose: what's amazing to me also is here is a guy who can calculate, lauda. he took a risk and he said he wanted to get out of a race because he thought the risk was too great. too damn high to continue so he pulls out. >> well, again, he was a -- he always thought, i think in the long term and a great overview and hunt was forever in the moment, whether he was on the track, whether he was in a club, whether he was home, wherever he was, very gifted man and, as i said, both entirely authentic. >> rose: so niki lauda realizes he's beginning to find some comf
provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: this was touted as the biggest day of the year for online shopping, as hundreds of retailers tried to lure millions of holiday shoppers on cyber monday. early numbers suggested a sharp increase over last year, after a four-day holiday weekend that turned out to be disappointing. in a few minutes, we'll take a deeper look at the numbers and retailers' prospects. the u.s. supreme court declined today to decide whether big online retailers have to collect state sales taxes. the justices turned away appeals from amazon and overstock.com after they lost a case in new york state. in the absence of a national ruling, more states may try to tax sales on the internet. a new york commuter tr
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